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Thursday, May 24, 2018

Sarah Rovenstine Demonstrating the Orange Whip and Power Sleeve Training Aids

Sarah is home from college for the summer and working on her swing to prepare for summer tournaments.  Sarah had a tendency to not hinge the wrists quite enough on the backswing causing her to release the club too early.  This move was limiting her potential for more distance with the driver and not allowing her to compress the ball with her irons.

Swinging the Orange Whip, which is a flexible and weighted training aid, helped her increase wrist hinge and over time will help her develop more clubhead speed.  In addition, we put the weighted Power Sleeve on her 9 iron and this added weight helped her accomplish the same items as above.  The great thing about the Power Sleeve is you can actually hit balls while using the training aid.

Both of these should be used daily for maximum benefit.

There is a similar training aid as the Orange Whip and it is called the Gold Flex.  Both the Gold Flex and Power Sleeve are available at SKLZ.com.





Student Mike Moriarty Perfoming the Two Count Pause Drill

Mike was not loading entirely into his right side due to swinging a bit too fast going back.  This was causing him to reverse pivot and then slide ahead of the ball on the downswing.  The result was his misses going to the right of target.

The best way to get him to slow down was to have him stop at the top of his backswing and pause for a count of...one thousand one...one thousand two, then give it a little pump and finish the swing.  We had to make sure he was in a great position at the top of his swing and he accomplished that.  Note how he is fully coiled into his right side and ready to deliver a solid swing to the finish.

After the two count pause we went to a one count pause and then had him feel there was just a slight pause in his normal swing.

Give it a try, this drill works for many swing issues.

Friday, May 4, 2018

Drill to Increase Lag in your Swing

If you tend to release the club early in the downswing you are costing yourself distance and accuracy.  The symptoms of an early release could include the following shot patterns: high ball flight, thin or fat shots and generally unsolid iron shots.

If you look at the top players in their downswing, they maintain close to a 90 degree angle between the hands and the golf club as the hands approach the right thigh.  If you cast your hands from the top of the swing you will not achieve that same angle.  My experience has shown that players with very long backswings have a tendency to release the hands too early.  It's much easier to retain the angle with a more compact backswing.

In the picture below, my student (left) is demonstrating an early release.  His ID is hidden to protect the guilty.   Note how the left arm and club are in alignment prior to impact.  Compared to my picture (right) our hands are in the same location but our shaft angle is substantially different.

 

At impact is when our left arm and shaft should be in alignment!


I recommend the Pump Drill in the video below to enhance the correct feel of developing lag in the downswing which produces a strong impact position. 

Perform the drill without a golf ball first just to get the feel of retaining the referenced angle.  Make sure you don't overdo the pump, but take about a 3/4 backswing and then let the hands approach the right thigh while maintaining the angle between the hands and club.

After a few reps without a ball, go ahead try hitting balls while performing the drill using a short iron such as an 8 or 9 iron.  Your ball striking may not be great at first but with a little practice the drill will produce good shots.  Be sure and video yourself and see if you making the change.

You are now ready to hit balls with your normal swing.  You should sense your left hand (right handers) is leading the way on the downswing.


                



Monday, April 30, 2018

Lance Walker Scores his Best Tournament Round

Congratulations to Lance Walker for his T2nd place in the STPGA Junior Tour Spring Series Championship.  Lance is making steady progress with his game and he shot his career tournament low round of 73 in the first round!    With his focus now on playing college golf, Lance is working hard on his game and improvements are showing in all areas.



Saturday, April 21, 2018

Congratulations to Mabrie and Eston!

Congratulations to Mabrie McMahan for her 10 shot victory in the AIPL 5/6 Division Girls Tournament at the Harvey Penick GC in Austin.  Mabrie has been working hard on her game and is making steady improvement in all areas. 


Congratulations is also in order for Eston Duff as he won the AIPL 7/8 Division Boys Tournament with a one under par score.  Eston has also been doing well on the US Kids Tour and has just started competing on the Texas Junior Golf Tour.


Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Drill to Improve Footwork and Balance

This is 9 year old Aiden Moore and he was having balance issues in his golf swing.  In particular, he was allowing his left foot to spin out causing him to fall forward to his toes after impact.

To help eliminate this issue, I teed up a golf ball just outside his left foot.  In addition I placed an alignment rod just outside his toes.  Aiden was to imagine he was standing near the edge of a swimming pool and the rod was the edge.  In this drill, he used a 7 iron and the goal was to make a swing and avoid bumping the ball off the tee by his foot and not take a dive into the pool.

Mission accomplished!


Friday, March 30, 2018

Use your "Noodle" to Improve your Swing

Sometimes the most useful training aids are right in your garage, pool or boat.  In this post I am swinging a simple foam noodle as a demonstration on how "lag" in the golf swing would appear.

Lag is the term used to describe the timing of the release of the club.  For example, if you look at pictures of TOUR professionals as they approach the impact area of the swing, you will see how the club head is behind the hands as their hand approach their back thigh area.  They still have plenty of energy stored and at the last second, bam, they release the club to the target!






To begin the process of developing lag, I am setting up with the noodle on the target side of the golf ball.  I begin the swing with my hands and arms dragging the noodle creating some nice width in my take away.  As I create width note how my torso is beginning to rotate and wind up.


                                         

The key is to get to the top of the swing and then start the downswing by a slight weight transfer to the lead leg and rotation of the hips to the target.  Note how the noodle is now "loaded" and ready to be released to the target.  In particular note the difference in my hip position from the top of the backswing to starting down. 




Here I am at approximately the impact position with the noodle.  With the noodle you can see the lag as the end of the noodle is still way behind my hands.  Obviously the noodle is more flexible than a golf shaft, but this exaggeration will help you at least feel what should be happening.  From impact there is just a free wheel feeling to the balanced finish.



The beauty of this drill is you don't need to be at the golf course nor in your golf clothes.  You could be in your driveway, back yard, pool or lake and still work on your swing!

Watch the video below and you will get a better sense as to how the drill is performed.